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Energy Saving Tips

Energy Conservation Reminder for the Holiday Shutdown

Our faculty and staff members did a great job pitching in to save energy for our Thanksgiving break. Thank you!  Here’s your reminder that the Winter Break is almost upon us and this shutdown period is one of the most important of the year for saving energy. As you prepare for longer break, take a few minutes to ready your area for this vital shutdown:

Classrooms/Offices

  • Refrigerators should be unplugged, cleaned out with its doors propped open. We recommend that this be completed at least one day prior to staff leaving for the shutdown so the unit can be monitored for excessive melting of built up ice in the freezer area:
    • Unplug the unit
    • Empty the appliance of all food
    • Block the door open so air can circulate and discourage mildew
  • Power down all copiers/printers /scanners
  • Unplug equipment such as computers/monitors/speakers, radios, televisions, mobile phone chargers, and power supplies for laptops, cell phones, etc.  (These devices continue to consume power when plugged in even when they are not connected to the device)
  • Turn off classroom equipment including Smartboards, projectors, etc.
  • Check to make sure all equipment is switched off in meeting rooms
  • Please be aware that personally owned space heaters are prohibited.  If you have a personally owned space heater on campus it is recommended that you take it with you when you leave for the holiday break.

Laboratories

  • Power off/unplug all unnecessary lab equipment
  • Ensure all fume-hood sashes are closed, and all fume-hood lights are turned off

NOTE: Unplugging equipment is preferable to turning it off as most electronic equipment continues to use power even when turned off.  If, however, your equipment is plugged into a switched power strip, please shut off the power switch on the power strip.

 

Help GRCC reduce "Phantom" electric loads on campus

A "phantom load" is any appliance or electronic gizmo that uses energy even when turned off. Some people call them "vampire appliances" or "energy vampires." Many electronic devices stay on, even when they're "off." Chargers for cell phones, digital cameras, and other gadgets draw energy even when they're not in use. Appliances like televisions, computers, monitors and DVD players can also draw power whenever they're plugged into an outlet.  You can help GRCC reduce the financial and environmental impact from these "vampire" appliances. If possible, unplugging devices is the simplest way to solve the problem, but can be a hassle. Plugging some of your devices into a surge protector that can be clicked on and off can make things easier.
Here are some clues to identify your energy suckers at home: They're appliances with remote controls, such as TVs, VCRs and audio equipment. They feature a continuous digital display -- like those glowing clocks on stoves. They feature rechargeable batteries, such as cordless phones (which use energy even after the battery is charged). And they're appliances with external power supplies, such as inkjet printers and iPod chargers.

Did you know?

To figure out how much electricity your lights use, follow this simple formula:

Daily Cost   =   Wattage   X   Time   X   Rate per kWh   ÷   1000

*average rates vary between 9 and 12 cents per kwh

A computer with a 17 inch LCD monitor left continuously running will cost approximately $128 a year to power at $0.09 per kWh. Turning a computer off at night so it runs only 8 hours will cost only $43 a year, or a 66% yearly savings.