Main Navigation Menu

Catalog Descriptions

PLAN

Planning involves developing what will be taught.  This encompasses topics that cover different aspects of choosing content, designing learning activities and objects, and organizing the learning.

Applying UDL in Your Course Planning

Universal Design for Learning is a set of principles for curriculum development that give all individuals equal opportunities to learn. UDL provides a blueprint for creating instructional goals, methods, materials, and assessments that work for everyone--not a single, one-size-fits-all solution but rather flexible approaches that can be customized and adjusted for individual needs. This session provides an introduction to how to incorporate universal design principles and accessible content into courses. After successful completion of this learning session, a learner/participant should be able to: Explain what Universal Design of Learning is; Explain why UDL is benefits learners; and identify five specific ways to integrate UDL principles into a course.

Getting the Semester Off to a Good Start

There are many things to consider when preparing for the first few days of class and most of us know these first contact hours are crucial to the success of the year overall. Planning ahead will decrease anxiety and nervousness for both you and your students while increasing your excitement. This session will provide tips and suggestions for preparing a syllabus that will work well for both you and your students, strategies for instructor and student introductions and tips for clarifying course learning objectives and expectations. The way you engage students on the first day sends powerful messages about the level of involvement and interaction you expect from them and helps to create a professional learning atmosphere.

Implementing Service Learning

Academic Service Learning (ASL) is a pedagogical approach that combines classroom learning with a community service project.  This session offers an overview of ASL, explains the process and documentation involved with integrating service learning into a class, prepares faculty for the unique educational environment of ASL, and explains the logistical and legal considerations faculty must be aware of when creating ASL experiences.  After completing the session, participants should have the knowledge and skills necessary to begin developing ASL experiences in their own courses.

Implementing Study Away

The Study Away Program is the program within the Department of Experiential Learning that involves off-campus study.  This session offers an overview of the program, explains the process and documentation involved with creating a Study Away experience, prepares faculty for the unique educational environment of Study Away, and explains the logistical and legal considerations faculty must be aware of when creating Study Away experiences.  After completing the session, participants should have the knowledge and skills necessary to begin developing Study Away experiences in their own courses.

Planning for Student Engagement

Keeping students involved, motivated and actively learning is a challenge for all educators. A variety of tips and techniques to promote student engagement will be discussed. Participants will explore strategies that can be used across numerous teaching disciplines to motivate and connect students.

Blackboard Basics

This session is designed to get you started using the basic functions of Blackboard 9.  Blackboard is GRCC’s course management system that allows you to communicate with your students. The basic items explored in this session will include a general overview and capabilities of Blackboard, using the Control Panel (edit mode) and Course Availability, managing the course menu, creating an announcement, populating content areas with items, adding folders and files, accessing the grade center to add columns and grades, and where to find support for Blackboard at GRCC.

Take Control of your File Storage with the Blackboard Content System

The Blackboard Content System (Bb CS) is a resource that provides each faculty member with 5 gigabytes of file storage accessible from on- and off-campus that you can use to store files for both public and private purposes. This session will provide an overview and introduction to the Bb CS and basic file management. PREREQUISITE: Blackboard Basics or equivalent introductory Blackboard training.

Managing Your Files with the Blackboard Content System

The Blackboard Content System (Bb CS) can be used to seamlessly update files used in Blackboard courses. This session will step you through the process of adding files and items from the Bb CS to a Blackboard Course. In addition, you will also learn how easily you can update your content for the next semester. PREREQUISITE: Take Control of your File Storage with the Blackboard Content System or equivalent introductory Blackboard Content System training.

Reading Apprenticeship

Reading Apprenticeship® (RA) is an instructional approach that intends to help community college students develop skills and knowledge to improve their engagement, fluency, and comprehension of content-area materials and texts. To achieve these goals, RA provides a range of professional development activities for faculty, as well as an academic literacy curricula for students. In both cases, RA calls for the faculty member to assume the role of expert reader. In this role, the faculty model and guide students’ text-based problem solving in order to build students’ comprehension strategies. By incorporating student/teacher discussions about the process of reading into content-area classes, Reading Apprenticeship® aims to make the teacher’s and students’ reading processes and knowledge visible to others in the classroom, help students understand and regulate their own reading processes, and help students develop strategies for overcoming obstacles while reading and for improving comprehension of texts from core academic disciplines. This session will introduce the RA approach.

Moving from Teacher-Centered to Student-Centered Learning

According to Collins & O’Brien (2003), “student-centered instruction is an instructional approach in which students influence the content, activities, materials and pace of learning.” This learning model places the student (learner) in the center of the learning process. This workshop will address the following questions: Why would you adopt a student-centered learning in your course?  Can you cover the content in your syllabus using an SCL approach?  Is it possible to move from teacher-centered learning to a student-centered learning in stages? How?

TEACH

Teaching involves the active delivery of the content in the “plan.”  The topics covered in this area are related to the things instructors do in the classroom (both online and physical) to facilitate learning and student success.

Promoting Student Engagement Through Active Learning

Student learning occurs most effectively in classrooms where the students are given opportunities to be actively engaged with the subject matter through meaningful activities and reflection.  How do instructors move beyond simple lectures and create those opportunities?  This workshop will help you develop strategies for fostering active learning in your classroom and engaging students in their own learning at a deeper level.  NOTE: this workshop is based on material presented in the “Building Classroom Communities” workshop during the Summer Institute.  If you attended that session, you might find some of this material redundant.

Building Classroom Communities

Many people, faculty and students alike, sometimes miss the significance of seeing the classroom as a community. Building classroom communities capable of creating learning environments that increase student success depend on the interactions of all its members. Of course, one unique feature of classroom community building is your role as faulty member, and creating a community of learners is the foundation of effective teaching. This session explores what it means to build classroom community by taking you beyond knowing your students’ names. This workshop will explore activities that encourage a passion for your subject, help you plan relevant and interesting activities to promote student confidence, engagement and a classroom climate that supports student learning.

Classroom Management Techniques

Establishing a climate for learning is one of the most challenging aspects of teaching, and one of the most difficult skills to master. For those new to the profession, failure to set the right tone will greatly hinder your effectiveness as a teacher. Indeed, even experienced faculty may sometimes feel frustrated by classroom management issues. This training will highlight the 10 effective classroom management techniques every faculty member should know for creating a positive learning environment – whether you’re a seasoned educator or someone who’s just starting out.

Promoting Student’s Awareness of Their Own Learning

Most students don’t spend much time thinking about learning in general or how they specifically learn. In order to become independent, self-directed learners, our students need to be able to begin to develop an awareness of themselves as learners. Recent research indicates that metacognitively aware learners are more strategic and perform better than unaware learners, allowing individuals to plan, sequence, and monitor their learning in a way that directly improves performance.  This session will review the use of the Metacognitive Awareness Inventory with students to better manage their cognitive skills, determine their weaknesses and promote self-regulated learning.

Getting Started with the Blackboard Grade Center

This session will introduce faculty to the basic capabilities of the Grade Center including creating a column, organizing columns, grade weighting, final grade columns, and downloading grades to Microsoft Excel. PREREQUISITE: Blackboard Basics or equivalent introductory Blackboard training

Blackboard Grade Center: Beyond the Basics

The Blackboard Grade Center is a powerful tool that supports custom grading scales, grade weighting, item analysis, and multiple gradebook views. This session will take faculty beyond the basic functions of the Grade Center and tackle more advance functions that can make your life easier. PREREQUISITE: Getting Started with the Blackboard Grade Center or equivalent introductory Blackboard Grade Center training.

Online Hybrid Certification Course

This multi-session learning opportunity prepares faculty to teach online and/or hybrid courses at Grand Rapids Community College.  Faculty must successfully complete this course before they will be permitted to teach online or hybrid courses.  The course includes an orientation and six modules.   Topics discussed include the following: Online and Hybrid Course Syllabus, Online and Hybrid Course Schedule, Accessible Online Content, Copyright Compliance, Universal Design for Learning, Consistency in Course Design, Academic Integrity and Authentication, Building Online Community, Facilitating Online and Hybrid Learning, Preparing the Online Learner, GRCC Online Course Development Process, GRCC Student Support Services, and Online Course Quality. PREREQUISITE: Blackboard Basics or equivalent introductory Blackboard training.

ASSESS

Assessing involves intentional examination of activities and results with the goal of understanding processes around learning and making strategic changes to those processes.  Topics associated with assessment could involve assessment of student learning, assessment of other classroom behaviors, and/or assessment associated with instructor activities.

Developing Rubrics

Rubrics are an effective and dynamic tool for describing learning outcomes and assessing the quality of the teaching and learning experience. As an authentic assessment tool, rubrics help both faculty and students.  This session will give participants opportunities to both review and create rubrics.

Becoming a Reflective Teacher

Reflective practice means to think about our workday, taking time to process the events in order to make better choices the next time. Educators must be able to objectively observe their own teaching practices and reflection is the perfect tool for doing so. Participants will explore what it means to be a “reflective practitioner” with reflection-in-action and reflection-on-action techniques.

Blackboard Assessments for Beginners

You can save time in the classroom by moving some of your tests or quizzes online. This session will give faculty an introduction to the assessment tool in Blackboard including an overview of tests, pools, and surveys. You will also learn about the different questions types available in Blackboard. By the end of this session, you will be able to build and deploy an entire assessment in Blackboard.  PREREQUISITE: Blackboard Basics or equivalent introductory Blackboard training. 

Save time Building Assessments with Respondus

Respondus is software available to all GRCC faculty which you can use to authoring both print and online exams. This session will show you how to build an assessment entirely in Respondus and then publish it to Blackboard. PREREQUISITE: Blackboard Assessments for Beginners or equivalent introductory Blackboard Assessment training. 

INCLUSION

Inclusion involves cultivating a campus and classroom climate that is supportive of all individuals, and recognizes the diversity of our community. In the classroom, creating instruction that is sensitive to the abilities and unique characteristics of a wide variety of learners is critical for student success.

GRCC: Our Changing Community

Who are our students?  In this interactive workshop, we will explore GRCC’s rich culture that exists within our student body.  We will also examine the many aspects of culture that enrich our campus, connect with other GRCC faculty and share best practices on cross cultural communication. 

Disability Etiquette

This session will cover some basic recommendations for interacting with students (and others) who have disabilities.  By the end of the session, participants will, 1) Learn appropriate language to use when communicating with people with disabilities and about disability, 2) Learn to be proactive to give your students the tools they need to succeed, and 3) Learn and dispel common myths about disability and people with disabilities

Engaging in SoTL

This session seeks to gather the SoTL elements of teaching scholarship that already exist here at GRCC and construct an ongoing dialogue. The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning treats teaching as scholarly work and was proposed in the 1990 report, Scholarship Reconsidered, by former Carnegie Foundation President Ernest Boyer, and on the 1997 follow-up publication, Scholarship Assessed, by Charles Glassick, Mary Taylor Huber, and Gene Maeroff. The development of a scholarship of teaching and learning fosters significant, long-lasting learning for all students; enhances the practice and profession of teaching, and; brings to faculty members' work as teachers the recognition and reward afforded to other forms of scholarly work. This session recognizes that achieving these goals involves significant shifts in thought and practice. For faculty in most settings, teaching is a private act, limited to the teacher and students; it is rarely evaluated by professional peers. "The result," writes former Carnegie Foundation President Lee S. Shulman, "is that those who engage in innovative acts of teaching rarely build upon the work of others; nor can others build upon theirs." Thus, the goal of this session is exploring how we might render teaching public, subject to critical evaluation, and usable by others in both the scholarly and the general community. 

Building Instructor/Student Relationships

How can I build and maintain classroom rapport? There is ample research proving that positive rapport between instructors and their students plays a significant role in teaching and learning. Participants will discover why classroom rapport is important for effective student learning as well as how to develop rapport-building and rapport-maintaining strategies.

FACULTY EVALUATION SYSTEM

In addition to offering workshops in our core curricular areas, the CTE also coordinates and schedules workshops on various aspects of the Faculty Evaluation System.  Unless otherwise noted, these workshops only cover the evaluation system for full-time faculty and not adjunct instructors.

Overview of the GRCC Faculty Evaluation System

This session provides an overview of the GRCC Faculty Evaluation System.  It provides an overview of the different components of the system, explains the required documentation, and provides an opportunity for faculty to ask questions.

Classroom Observation Training

Classroom observations are an important component of the evaluation system but how do you perform effective classroom observations that result in constructive feedback?  This session explains the behaviors that characterize effective instruction and assists faculty in using those behaviors as benchmarks for effective and appropriate peer evaluation.  It also covers the documentation associated with classroom observations in the Faculty Evaluation System.  The session covers information on observation of both face to face and online courses.  NOTE: Completion of this session is required before faculty will be permitted to complete classroom observations of peers.  

Understanding Teaching and Assessment Projects in the GRCC Faculty Evaluation System

Each faculty member completing the Yearly Distribution Requirements (YDRs) in the GRCC Faculty Evaluation System must complete one project to assess student learning and one project to improve teaching effectiveness (faculty members completing the satisfactory standards for employment must complete an assessment project but are not required to complete a teaching effectiveness project).  How do those projects work?  This session addresses the requirements and documentation associated with these projects and offers faculty an opportunity to develop ideas for projects.  After completing this session, participants should be able to: 1) articulate the requirements for teaching and assessment projects, 2) complete the necessary documentation for their projects, 3) draft several personal project ideas.  

Completing FPE Reports

This session will provide information on the reports that must be completed each year by full-time faculty as part of the Faculty Evaluation System.  After completing this session you should understand the general expectations for an effective FPE report, be able to describe the appropriate documentation required for each section of the FPE report, and understand the approval process and due dates for the FPE report.

Portfolio Training

The portfolio is the primary documentary evidence used for tenure review and promotions in rank.  It is used by all tenure and promotion review committees as foundation of their deliberations.  This workshop will introduce participants to the portfolio at GRCC and the processes surrounding it.  NOTE: completion of this session is required for any faculty member who wishes to serve on a rank or tenure committee.

Special Topics Sessions

The workshops in the previous categories cover “core” topics that reflect ongoing faculty development needs.  Special Topics workshops cover topics that may only apply for a limited duration or may reflect offerings the CTE is supporting through coordination and tracking. 

New Course Development in Curriculog

GRCC is replacing the CARP system for course development with a web-based platform called Curriculog.  Moving forward, Curriculog will be used to manage all processes for curriculum development and revision at GRCC.  This session will provide an overview of the various functions of Curriculog and the process for developing a new course.  The topics that will be covered in this session are: 1) setting up and using your account in Curriculog, 2) an overview of the basic functions of the Curriculog system, 3) the approval process for new courses, 4) how to complete the new course form in Curriculog, 5) a review of the definitions for the curricular fields.  The training component of the session will last two hours.  The last hour of the session is reserved for faculty to have the opportunity to receive technical assistance to begin the development of a new course.  Department heads are encouraged to attend these sessions in order to become familiar with the processes and approval steps.

Course Review & Revision in Curriculog

GRCC is replacing the CARP system for course development with a web-based platform called Curriculog.  Moving forward, Curriculog will be used to manage all processes for curriculum development and revision at GRCC.  This session will provide an overview of the various functions of Curriculog and the process for course review and revision.  The topics that will be covered in this session are: 1) setting up and using your account in Curriculog, 2) an overview of the basic functions of the Curriculog system, 3) the approval process for course revision, 4) how to complete the course revision form in Curriculog, 5) a review of the definitions for the curricular fields.  The training component of the session will last two hours.  The last hour of the session is reserved for faculty to have the opportunity to receive technical assistance to work on the revision of a course.  Department heads are encouraged to attend these sessions in order to become familiar with the processes and approval steps.